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  • So, the topic of my forum discussion is a loaded question, at least I feel it can come across as one but I was on the Assassin's Creed Reddit community just now reading about the Animus Pulse and Bayek's Eagle Vision. Anyway, the Reddit poster basically wanted to know if Eagle Vision as we are accustomed to it, is still canon within the series, as a Precursor related ability, or if the devs went back to the previous explanation of the Animus representing the Assassin's observational skills. Various AC protagonists have described Eagle Vision differently, such as Edward Kenway saying it was like feeling the impressions of sounds and shapes in his environment. I think Altair also described it as being able to see the auras of various individuals. Bayek's Eagle Vision is far more literal in this sense as he has a symbolic relationship with his pet eagle, Senu. However, when activating the "traditional" Eagle Vision, it merely highlighted objects of importance, much akin to Lara Croft's Survival Instincts from the rebooted Crystal Dynamic games. I think this reinforces the idea that Eagle Vision, at least in its most basic form, was a representation of the Assassin's observational skills. So, has Ubisoft done away with the canon explanation that Eagle Vision is a Precursor ability, or have they gone back to the AC1 explanation? Wherein the Animus represented the Assassin's observational skills through the traditional Eagle Vision we know. 

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    • I actually don't recall AC1 ever establishing explicitly that Eagle Vision was only the Animus's way of representing the Assassin's observational skills. After all, at the end of the game, Desmond uses Eagle Vision outside of the Animus, and from Assassin's Creed II onward, it's firmly established as part of the lore that it's not an Animus feature. Otherwise Desmond could not have been able to unlock the door to escape the Abstergo facility for instance.

      In any case, Eagle Vision is explained in the lore as being a manifestation of the sixth sense of knowledge that the Isu supposedly possessed. I believe that the way it seems to work is that it feeds back answers to questions that the user is mentally processing. So if a user is seeking to distinguish ally from foe, Eagle Vision provides that intuitive "knowledge" for instance. If a user is seeking a passcode for a door, Eagle Vision provides that knowledge.

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    • If you read the trivia section for the first AC game, I believe it establishes that I remember reading it somewhere on the Wiki as well, either on the Eagle Vision article or the AC1 article. I'll see if I can find a direct quotation. Okay, yeah, if you direct your attention to the Eagle Vision article, navigate to trivia, for the first game, it says: 

      • In Assassin's Creed, Eagle Vision was said to actually be the Animus' visualization of the Assassin's observational skills.

      So there was at least one point where Eagle Vision was explained to be the Animus's visualization or representation of the Assassin's observational skills. Likely Ubisoft did not envision taking the series to the extent that Eagle Vision would be a Precursor related ability. I don't know where in the game it actually mentions this, maybe in the manual. That's the only reason why I'm asking, because Bayek's Eagle Vision only highlights objects of importance, but doesn't highlight guards in the typical red aura. 

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    • It's technically lore wise a precursor ability passed to people with high precursor DNA

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    • Even in Assassin's Creed, Eagle Vision was more than just observational skills abstracted by the Animus, given that at the end Desmond obtains the ability to use it in the modern day. The original game might have implied that that's all it was (not textually at least), but if so it was in service of the twist.

      As it stands it is definitely a sixth sense, more than simple observation. Characters in ancillary materials (Initiates, Project Legacy) describe it as a second vision or something to turn on (with difficulty). Even more current materials depict it as more than sight. Charlotte de la Cruz literally sees through walls to see a ventilation shaft that she uses to aid her escape.

      As for Bayek's manifestation of the ability, we have yet to actually play the game to judge its depiction and see if it fits with the others or if it's wildly different. However I don't believe that what we've seen in the game contradicts or changes in any way, shape or form how Eagle Vision has been established to work.

      tl;dr: It was never not a special ability, it still is one, and Origins is not retconning it.

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    • Has it been confirmed that Bayek has Eagle Vision?

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    • Here's what we're told in Assassin's Creed during the tutorial:

      "Now that you are fully synched, a new ability is available to you. Referred to as Eagle Vision, this sixth sense helped your ancestor understand the intentions of people around him."

      It's pretty clearly stated to be an ability that Altaïr actually possessed, rather than being an interpretation of the Animus.

      As for Bayek, I suspect that the explanation we're gonna get is that he has far more Precursor DNA in him than later generations of Assassins, thus giving him access to a far more powerful (and literal) Eagle Vision.

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    • That's what I figured, it just seems very contradictory because I've seen gameplay footage of Bayek using Eagle Vision while not calling for Senu, and all it does is highlight objects of importance just like how in Rise of the Tomb Raider, when using Survival Instinct, Lara Croft is able to see objects of importance and spot enemies, red meant that the enemies were in proximity of each other and yellow meant that they were far enough away for a stealth attack. Yellow was also the color of highlighted objects, et al. I feel as though if Bayek had a more powerful version of Eagle Vision, his would be capable of doing all the things that later Assassins could do with it.

      So, I am at least somewhat certain that Bayek didn't even have Eagle Vision, or that Eagle Vision is in some way connected to the observational skills of the Assassins. 

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    • Or maybe it's Eagle Vision depicted/used in a different manner? I don't see how you can come to the conclusion that Bayek doesn't have Eagle Vision when his vision can literally attach itself to an eagle, and even the developers are calling it Eagle Vission.

      Also, what does it matter what Lara Croft gets/uses in Rise of the Tomb Raider?

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    • Only important objects are highlighted when Bayek uses Eagle Vision, but not enemies or anything of that sort. I only compare it to Survival Instinct because it functions similarly to that. Maybe Bayek's Eagle Vision is connected to Senu, but it's such a drastic difference from the traditional Eagle Vision. 

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    • I think it's entirely possible that Eagle Vision can manifest in different ways.

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    • Sol Pacificus wrote:
      I think it's entirely possible that Eagle Vision can manifest in different ways.

      Hmmm... yeah, I guess so. Arno's Eagle Vision enabled him to see the memories of his targets, and Edward Kenway's Eagle Vision enabled him to tag enemies and targets. 

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    • SupremeAssassin wrote:

      Sol Pacificus wrote:
      I think it's entirely possible that Eagle Vision can manifest in different ways.

      Hmmm... yeah, I guess so. Arno's Eagle Vision enabled him to see the memories of his targets, and Edward Kenway's Eagle Vision enabled him to tag enemies and targets. 

      Edward spoke to the dying target while Arno saw the memories of the dying target

      Both visions taged enemies

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    • Eagle Vision is how Assassins call the Sixth Sense they and other people inherited from the Isu. And the Eagle Vision, with it's different characteristics, is just a part of the whole Sense the Isu had. So yeah, there are different types of Eagle Vision, which can also be mastered and developed. 

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    • I think it's safe to say that Ezio is the only person who mastered Eagle Vision though, no one else has exhibited Eagle Sense. Except maybe Altair, but maybe that was just a gameplay convenience and not canon. Also, Arno couldn't really tag targets in the traditional manner of Edward, Shay, and the Frye twins. I felt Arno's was the weakest because he couldn't use it for long periods of time whereas Ezio could free-run while using Eagle Vision. 

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    • And adien Pearce used a eagle vision called the "profiler"

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    • In conclussion (for those who dislike to read a lot, not me of course):

      1- Eagle Vision is definitely a Precursor related ability and not a way of representing an Assassin's observational skills.

      2- There are many types of Eagle Vision: Altair's (Default), Ezio's (available while running), Ezio's (mastered version also called Eagle Sense. It allows to "see" through time, watch past and future events". Also identifies the true nature of a person [Normal Eagle Vision cannot do this]), Connor's and Aveline's (identifies clues fast), Edward's (tag enemies), Shay's (tag hidden enemies and locates them), Arno's (short duration [who thought this was a good idea?]), and Frye Twin's (It evolves with practice).

      3- It's not confirmed if Bayek possesses Eagle Vision.

      Now, some theories:

      1- The Animus Pulse could be a skill only available in the simulation, just like Evie's cloak or the Helix abilities in Chronicles (except the Russia chapter, in my opinion that was very stupid) whose purpose is to help us finding collectibles faster.

      2- Bayek may not possesses "Eagle Vision" but another Precursor related ability: Telepathy with his animal companion, just like Falcon and his bird Redwing. I think he (Falcon, from the Marvel Comics) is the perfect example of this new concept and it can help us understanding it better.

      3- This may be a new beginning for new precursor related abilities. Because, I don't think Bayek "controls" Senu, he sees through its eyes... telepathy is my best bet. Thanks to the bleeding effect and the requirement of needing a sample to simulate memories, this could allow us to control it without needing a blood sample.

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    • Cristophorus35 wrote: In conclussion (for those who dislike to read a lot, not me of course):

      1- Eagle Vision is definitely a Precursor related ability and not a way of representing an Assassin's observational skills.

      2- There are many types of Eagle Vision: Altair's (Default), Ezio's (available while running), Ezio's (mastered version also called Eagle Sense. It allows to "see" through time, watch past and future events". Also identifies the true nature of a person [Normal Eagle Vision cannot do this]), Connor's and Aveline's (identifies clues fast), Edward's (tag enemies), Shay's (tag hidden enemies and locates them), Arno's (short duration [who thought this was a good idea?]), and Frye Twin's (It evolves with practice).

      3- It's not confirmed if Bayek possesses Eagle Vision.

      Now, some theories:

      1- The Animus Pulse could be a skill only available in the simulation, just like Evie's cloak or the Helix abilities in Chronicles (except the Russia chapter, in my opinion that was very stupid) whose purpose is to help us finding collectibles faster.

      2- Bayek may not possesses "Eagle Vision" but another Precursor related ability: Telepathy with his animal companion, just like Falcon and his bird Redwing. I think he (Falcon, from the Marvel Comics) is the perfect example of this new concept and it can help us understanding it better.

      Eagle Vision evolves with practice for all the Assassins, not just the Frye twins, though this isn't shown as a gameplay mechanic in the other games. For example, Altaïr's Eagle Vision in Revelations is shown to be the same as Ezio's. Ezio's Eagle Vision definitely evolved throughout his life such that he could track scents as well and target's routes in Revelations. Ezio's Eagle Vision does not, however, lend him the ability to "see" through time. That ability is provided through Pieces of Eden, like the Apple, and was how Altaïr was able to create the Hidden Gun.

      Also, Arno had the special ability to see the memories of his targets upon killing them, though I guess that wasn't Eagle Vision.

      As for Animus Pulse, I want to point out the name seems to be derived from "Eagle Pulse" though, which was the original name for Arno's Eagle Vision in gameplay trailers.

      I'm fairly certain that Bayek's synergy with his eagle is meant to be an ability called Eagle Vision. The question is whether it's meant to be the same as later Eagle Visions, manifested differently, or an entirely different ability that inspires the name of the later clairvoyant ability.

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    • Cristophorus35
      Cristophorus35 removed this reply because:
      mistakes
      08:36, June 28, 2017
      This reply has been removed
    • Sol Pacificus wrote:

      Eagle Vision evolves with practice for all the Assassins, not just the Frye twins, though this isn't shown as a gameplay mechanic in the other games. For example, Altaïr's Eagle Vision in Revelations is shown to be the same as Ezio's. Ezio's Eagle Vision definitely evolved throughout his life such that he could track scents as well and target's routes in Revelations. Ezio's Eagle Vision does not, however, lend him the ability to "see" through time. That ability is provided through Pieces of Eden, like the Apple, and was how Altaïr was able to create the Hidden Gun.

      Exactly. I didn't forget about that. But as you say, I was talking about the gameplay mechanics, of what we see in the game.

      I dunno about Altaïr's practices because first, the crosshair we see when we play as him appears also when we play as Desmond (and he didn't unlocked Eagle Sense), so that may be gameplay factor. Second, Altaïr could see Maria's final moments again when he confronted Abbas. As we know, one can activate Eagle Vision while walking as the old man and we'll see some kind of ghost resembling Altaïr's and Maria's appearences. Their voices cannot be heard but, with the help of subtitles, we can know what they're talking about. That's the only moment Altaïr had some features of Eagle Sense. I dunno if this is explained in the book, but as far as I know, Altaïr could run and fight while using Eagle Vision, and this is gameplay factor. (Because the movements and animations are Ezio's as well). And let's not forget about air assassinations before Altaïr's improvements.

      Oh, when I talked about Ezio being able to "see" through time I was refering to the moments before he even touched the Apple or the Memory Seals. In the town (yeah, I'm calling it town because my english is not that perfect XD) close to Masyaf, Ezio could see where Leandros went (past) and the paths the guards take (future). I say "see" because he could see this ghosts in front of him. Also, in the first part of killing the Sentinel, Ezio could see him killing the assassins apprentice (past) and see the paths the Ottoman guards take so he can prepare an ambush (future).

      But... I don't know if Ezio could see Altaïr's "ghost" when he was climbing the fortress of Masyaf. Did he? I think so.

      Sol Pacificus wrote:

      Also, Arno had the special ability to see the memories of his targets upon killing them, though I guess that wasn't Eagle Vision.

      He also had the ability of... croissant (?) XD... the ability of hearing things that were far away. I don't know if that's a feature of his Eagle Vision but the conversation with Germain seems to prove it.

      Sol Pacificus wrote:

      As for Animus Pulse, I want to point out the name seems to be derived from "Eagle Pulse" though, which was the original name for Arno's Eagle Vision in gameplay trailers.

      Eagle Pulse could only be a "gameplay concept", because when we change Arno's hoods, they refer to it as Eagle Vision, when we upgrade it. The words "Eagle Pulse" are never used in the game. (As far as I know. I never saw them when I was playing Unity).

      Sol Pacificus wrote:

      I'm fairly certain that Bayek's synergy with his eagle is meant to be an ability called Eagle Vision. The question is whether it's meant to be the same as later Eagle Visions, manifested differently, or an entirely different ability that inspires the name of the later clairvoyant ability.

      It could be, because if other assassins could see the "blue shimmer", before him (for example Amunet or Darius himself) and take Bayek's ability as an inspiration, they easily could name this ability "eagle vision". But there's no doubt this abiliy was long before Bayek and that he possesses something different. If Senu can see/locate Bayek's enemies and targets and "tell" Bayek where they are (and viceversa), Telepathy is the ability that meets all these requirements.

      This is getting interesting.

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    • So now we are suggesting that Bayek has telepathy? Did the Precursors even exhibit that ability outside of the Pieces of Eden? 

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    • SupremeAssassin wrote: So now we are suggesting that Bayek has telepathy? Did the Precursors even exhibit that ability outside of the Pieces of Eden? 

      The full extent of the Isu's abilities have never been revealed anyways, only that it's far superior to that of humans, and what we've seen so far of them has not shown them to be that much more superior aside from advanced technology, so there's much of their capabilities still left unrevealed.

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    • SupremeAssassin wrote:
      So now we are suggesting that Bayek has telepathy? Did the Precursors even exhibit that ability outside of the Pieces of Eden? 

      At least with Senu, yes. Of course it's just a theory, I don't know if you guys support it (it's okay if you don't) but I bet my non-existent hidden blade on it hehe.

      Assassin's Creed has a custom of explaining history periods, wars, phenomenons and things like that through biological studies, history documents, logical events and superheroes paradigma. (Let's not forget Otzo Berg is the new batman haha). So telepathy is a very plausable theory.

      If a thing like Eagle Vision exists, why not others abilities? :)

      Just think about it: if AC is not going to involve anthropomorphic gods,then there must be an explanation for figures like Sethmet and Anubis... and Bayek may have the answer.

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    • Cristophorus35 wrote:

      SupremeAssassin wrote:
      So now we are suggesting that Bayek has telepathy? Did the Precursors even exhibit that ability outside of the Pieces of Eden? 

      At least with Senu, yes. Of course it's just a theory, I don't know if you guys support it (it's okay if you don't) but I bet my non-existent hidden blade on it hehe.

      Assassin's Creed has a custom of explaining history periods, wars, phenomenons and things like that through biological studies, history documents, logical events and superheroes paradigma. (Let's not forget Otzo Berg is the new batman haha). So telepathy is a very plausable theory.

      If a thing like Eagle Vision exists, why not others abilities? :)

      Just think about it: if AC is not going to involve anthropomorphic gods,then there must be an explanation for figures like Sethmet and Anubis... and Bayek may have the answer.

      Telepathy isn't really too far'fetched of a superhuman ability and definitely remains closer to the realm of possibility in a science fiction setting.

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    • Why does no one think that perhaps there is no actual connection to Senu and the bird is just "scouting" for you i.e. he's scoping out the area and "reporting" back. Obviously, I don't mean talking to you but some game logic explaination that he tilts his head and squcks 3 times if there are 3 enemies in a direction.

      There's a distinct possiblity that perhaps Dayek doesn't even have eagle vision at all. It seems that though everyone has the potential, not even all assassins have unlocked eagle vision. For instance, EV was something special Altair had that not all of the other assassins did. 

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    • 104.128.105.228 wrote:
      Why does no one think that perhaps there is no actual connection to Senu and the bird is just "scouting" for you i.e. he's scoping out the area and "reporting" back. Obviously, I don't mean talking to you but some game logic explaination that he tilts his head and squcks 3 times if there are 3 enemies in a direction.

      Because, for now, Senu only does a sound when she found a main target, all other enemies are just marked and that information flows from Senu's brain to Bayek's (in a matter of speaking) and viceversa. To scout an area implies that Senu has to return to Bayek to "tell" him where the enemies are and that doesn't happen in the demo.

      That's just a theory based in what we see in those gameplays.

      EDIT: My bad. I can see, in the gameplay, that Senu DOES make sounds when "scouting" the area. But it seems to trigger randomly and not when spotting and enemy :/, being exceptions main targets.

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    • 104.128.105.228 wrote: Why does no one think that perhaps there is no actual connection to Senu and the bird is just "scouting" for you i.e. he's scoping out the area and "reporting" back. Obviously, I don't mean talking to you but some game logic explaination that he tilts his head and squcks 3 times if there are 3 enemies in a direction.

      There's a distinct possiblity that perhaps Dayek doesn't even have eagle vision at all. It seems that though everyone has the potential, not even all assassins have unlocked eagle vision. For instance, EV was something special Altair had that not all of the other assassins did. 

      That is possible, but it's less exciting and creative. Assassin's Creed is primarily science fiction, but thematically, it's meant to have healthy doses of fantasy as well. It's called Eagle Vision, something that has always been supernatural and phenomenal to us, and for Eagle Vision to be literally reduced to nothing at all would be bland and kind of a betrayal of its mystique. It makes more sense that if this is a novel, distinct form of Eagle Vision that there remains some fascinating element about it rather than just a simplification of an eagle reporting back to you.

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    • If he can't "see" trough Senu's eyes with his Eagle Vision. How do we explain that in the demo he called out his target by name the moment Senu located him?

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    • ACsenior wrote:
      If he can't "see" trough Senu's eyes with his Eagle Vision. How do we explain that in the demo he called out his target by name the moment Senu located him?

      He could knew his target, Radunamum (?) Ratonhnhakë,tón (?) XD, before entering Siwa.

      And... let me explain how Telepathy works if this theory is correct: Bayek can't see through Senu's eyes (for now) and Senu can't see through Bayek's eyes. Telepathy is like a mindreading/mindcomunication ability. Take for example, you and me. I spotted an enemy behind you and I tell you telepathycally "hey dude, there's an enemy behind you" and without looking back, you kill him.

      I don't think Bayek controls Senu, because the bird shows absolutely independence when it moves.

      EDIT: Oh! If you ask how the hell can Senu knows what the enemy is doing (walking, sleeping, watching, etc.)... I don't know haha.

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    • Maybe Senu just enhances Bayek's Eagle Vision, like looking through a mirror or something. It's not really the craziest thing I've seen in Assassin's Creed but it's definitely farfetched when they don't even explain how Bayek is able to glean the information from Senu's scouting. 

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    • Cristophorus35 wrote:

      ACsenior wrote:
      If he can't "see" trough Senu's eyes with his Eagle Vision. How do we explain that in the demo he called out his target by name the moment Senu located him?

      He could knew his target, Radunamum (?) Ratonhnhakë,tón (?) XD, before entering Siwa.

      And... let me explain how Telepathy works if this theory is correct: Bayek can't see through Senu's eyes (for now) and Senu can't see through Bayek's eyes. Telepathy is like a mindreading/mindcomunication ability. Take for example, you and me. I spotted an enemy behind you and I tell you telepathycally "hey dude, there's an enemy behind you" and without looking back, you kill him.

      I don't think Bayek controls Senu, because the bird shows absolutely independence when it moves.

      EDIT: Oh! If you ask how the hell can Senu knows what the enemy is doing (walking, sleeping, watching, etc.)... I don't know haha.

      Yes he may know who his target is but not where he specifically is. Senu located and when Senu did, Bayek called him out by name. How did Beyek know his target was located and knew it was him? Regardless of how his Eagle Vision work, he called him out as if he just located the target with his own eyes. So if Senu signals Beyek about the locations of targets, how does Senu difference between guards and the main target? Didn't say he controlled Senu but that there seems to be a connection between them that allows him to get the information Senu collects when Senu collects it.

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    • Cristophorus35 wrote:
      ACsenior wrote:
      If he can't "see" trough Senu's eyes with his Eagle Vision. How do we explain that in the demo he called out his target by name the moment Senu located him?
      He could knew his target, Radunamum (?) Ratonhnhakë,tón (?) XD, before entering Siwa.

      And... let me explain how Telepathy works if this theory is correct: Bayek can't see through Senu's eyes (for now) and Senu can't see through Bayek's eyes. Telepathy is like a mindreading/mindcomunication ability. Take for example, you and me. I spotted an enemy behind you and I tell you telepathycally "hey dude, there's an enemy behind you" and without looking back, you kill him.

      I don't think Bayek controls Senu, because the bird shows absolutely independence when it moves.

      EDIT: Oh! If you ask how the hell can Senu knows what the enemy is doing (walking, sleeping, watching, etc.)... I don't know haha.

      It's Madunamun, I'm quite sure of that. 

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    • SupremeAssassin wrote: Maybe Senu just enhances Bayek's Eagle Vision, like looking through a mirror or something. It's not really the craziest thing I've seen in Assassin's Creed but it's definitely farfetched when they don't even explain how Bayek is able to glean the information from Senu's scouting. 

      Well, they "don't even explain how Bayek is able to glean the information from Senu's scouting" because we don't have the game yet.

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    • Keep in mind that the developers themselves have called Bayek's ability Eagle Vision and stated that he sees "through [Senu's] eyes".

      Y'all arguing semantics for something that has already been defined.

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    • We should also keep in mind that these are Bayek's genetic memories that someone is reliving through the Animus, if Bayek could not actually see through Senu's eyes, then neither could the person reliving his memories.

      Unless someone is suggesting that the Animus also has access to Senu's genetic memories through one of his descendants, I think it's safe to say that this is an actual ability that Bayek had.  

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    • Zero-ELEC wrote:
      Keep in mind that the developers themselves have called Bayek's ability Eagle Vision and stated that he sees "through [Senu's] eyes".

      That's because the meaning was taken literally. But AC explains everything it does one way or another. Just like the concept of eagle vision before this soft reboot, like how Juno saved the earth, and on and on.

      I think this stuff is worth discussing because it's just explained in terms of gameplay mechanics and not in the lore (obviously). And it gives the community something to think about.

      OH! And they also must explain why the f$#% Bayek can control arrows in mid-air. Bayek has Telepathy and Telekinesis!? :o! New theory! *sarcasm*

      The eagle vision the developers talk about is just used as a term, just a word. Because it's not the EV we all know. In the controls it's called "Animus pulse" and the botton that allows us to control Senu it's called "Call Eagle". So the semantic here it's not defined at all as "EV".

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    • The Wikia Editor wrote:
      We should also keep in mind that these are Bayek's genetic memories that someone is reliving through the Animus, if Bayek could not actually see through Senu's eyes, then neither could the person reliving his memories.

      If this's correct, then there's no telepathy. Bayek can control Senu with some kind of "possession"... That's fu*#%$g sick man.

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    • The Wikia Editor wrote: We should also keep in mind that these are Bayek's genetic memories that someone is reliving through the Animus, if Bayek could not actually see through Senu's eyes, then neither could the person reliving his memories.

      Unless someone is suggesting that the Animus also has access to Senu's genetic memories through one of his descendants, I think it's safe to say that this is an actual ability that Bayek had.  

      This is actually an excellent point.

      In any case, I have never doubted that the intended explanation is that Bayek can literally share the vision of Senu. This is a common element in fantasy settings where characters have a symbiotic relationship with an animal companion. I highly doubt Bayek can actually possess Senu though. More telling is that he actually does say "Be my eyes Senu" even if there's varying degrees of how literal he means by that.

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    • Sol Pacificus wrote:

      In any case, I have never doubted that the intended explanation is that Bayek can literally share the vision of Senu. This is a common element in fantasy settings where characters have a symbiotic relationship with an animal companion. I highly doubt Bayek can actually possess Senu though. More telling is that he actually does say "Be my eyes Senu" even if there's varying degrees of how literal he means by that.

      Yeah, the possession is kinda stupid and it should not be related with this.

      But if Bayek can see what Senu sees... why can we control her? Of course it's because game mechanics and it makes it more entertaining and interesting, but how do they explian that in the AC lore? It should be just cinematics and not actual bird gameplay, you understand.

      Meh. I'll just wait for the game. In fact, that's what we all should do. I'll see if I can send a question to the game director about this in his twitter. If he replies "Not gonna spoil anything", it's confirmed that Bayek has some mind business with Senu.

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    • Cristophorus35 wrote:

      Sol Pacificus wrote:

      In any case, I have never doubted that the intended explanation is that Bayek can literally share the vision of Senu. This is a common element in fantasy settings where characters have a symbiotic relationship with an animal companion. I highly doubt Bayek can actually possess Senu though. More telling is that he actually does say "Be my eyes Senu" even if there's varying degrees of how literal he means by that.

      Yeah, the possession is kinda stupid and it should not be related with this.

      But if Bayek can see what Senu sees... why can we control her? Of course it's because game mechanics and it makes it more entertaining and interesting, but how do they explian that in the AC lore? It should be just cinematics and not actual bird gameplay, you understand.

      Meh. I'll just wait for the game. In fact, that's what we all should do. I'll see if I can send a question to the game director about this in his twitter. If he replies "Not gonna spoil anything", it's confirmed that Bayek has some mind business with Senu.

      I think when you control Senu, you're literally controlling the bird itself, as a character, not Bayek controlling Senu. However, in-universe, whoever is at the Animus isn't "controlling" Senu. Even with his or her ancestor after all, he or she isn't really controlling the ancestor, though he or she may try and doing too hard can cause desynchronization. The person at the Animus is just viewing the memories of Bayek viewing from Senu. We as the player can control Senu as a character just as we could with Ezio, Haytham, Shay, etc. but this doesn't have to mean that the character reliving his ancestor's memory has to have been able to control Senu as well. For that modern-day character, it's all about just synchronizing with the memory. Presumably, while he can try to control Bayek's actions a little without desynchronizing, he cannot at all with Senu.

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    • Sol Pacificus wrote:

      Even with his or her ancestor after all, he or she isn't really controlling the ancestor, though he or she may try and doing too hard can cause desynchronization. The person at the Animus is just viewing the memories of Bayek viewing from Senu. We as the player can control Senu as a character just as we could with Ezio, Haytham, Shay, etc. but this doesn't have to mean that the character reliving his ancestor's memory has to have been able to control Senu as well. For that modern-day character, it's all about just synchronizing with the memory. Presumably, while he can try to control Bayek's actions a little without desynchronizing, he cannot at all with Senu.

      Hmm? But the person at the Animus had always control of his/her ancestor's action with some limitations due desynchronization... Now I understand why they call it synchronization (damn... I should have known years ago... s#!t). The person at the animus is not just viewing the memories of his/her ancestor like a movie while she/he is in some kind of inducted coma. They are there in the middle of the action... How do I explain it... I hope you catch my meaning, some concepts you already know but I'll explain them anyway for cohesion's sake:

      When we play AC we're not playing as the person in the past, we're playing as the modern day character who is reliving the memories of his/her ancestor at the animus. So this modern day character can control some actions of the ancestor: climbing, jumping, viewing the surroundings, running, fighting, eagle vision-ing, accessing to the main menu, changing animus options, failing, using weapons, etc. But some as: talking, thinking, taking a bath, the actions that the ancestor makes in the cutscenes and in the middle of a mission/memory are the ancestor's own printed in the modern-day character's. Just like Desmond when he felt Ezio's finger being branded, when he synchronized for the first time as with Haytham's memories, when Charlotte desynchronized when she was forcing the parameters of the simulation to save the girl and when the players of the multiplayer kill eachother in the simulation (in this case there're no printing of the ancestor's actions except when you taunt someone).

      It's not just viewing, it's to participate in the simulation following the rule to allow synchronization. That's what it is: being one with your ancestor's actions, decisions and feeling of the environment, let them enter your body and conscience... being your ancestor. Just like it happened with Lynch when he synchronized for the first time with Aguilar or with Clay. Thanks to that Desmond showed some muscle development while he was reliving Connor's memories, there's some activity implied here.

      Having that in mind I ask myself... if the new modern-day protagonist will relive the memories of Bayek... how the f"%# could he/she control the goddamned bird!? For now there's no genetic memory from the bird, only Bayek's. The only way to do that could be as you say: Bayek's actions are controled by the M.D.Ch and not Senu's or telepathy (Senu's action are simulated by Animus parameters obtained by Bayek's memories) or something else.

      Ufff... Yeah, I take this game too seriously even for my taste. But I really like it *sad face*

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    • Cristophorus35 wrote: Hmm? But the person at the Animus had always control of his/her ancestor's action with some limitations due desynchronization... Now I understand why they call it synchronization (damn... I should have known years ago... s#!t). The person at the animus is not just viewing the memories of his/her ancestor like a movie while she/he is in some kind of inducted coma. They are there in the middle of the action... How do I explain it... I hope you catch my meaning, some concepts you already know but I'll explain them anyway for cohesion's sake:

      When we play AC we're not playing as the person in the past, we're playing as the modern day character who is reliving the memories of his/her ancestor at the animus. So this modern day character can control some actions of the ancestor: climbing, jumping, viewing the surroundings, running, fighting, eagle vision-ing, accessing to the main menu, changing animus options, failing, using weapons, etc. But some as: talking, thinking, taking a bath, the actions that the ancestor makes in the cutscenes and in the middle of a mission/memory are the ancestor's own printed in the modern-day character's. Just like Desmond when he felt Ezio's finger being branded, when he synchronized for the first time as with Haytham's memories, when Charlotte desynchronized when she was forcing the parameters of the simulation to save the girl and when the players of the multiplayer kill eachother in the simulation (in this case there're no printing of the ancestor's actions except when you taunt someone).

      It's not just viewing, it's to participate in the simulation following the rule to allow synchronization. That's what it is: being one with your ancestor's actions, decisions and feeling of the environment, let them enter your body and conscience... being your ancestor. Just like it happened with Lynch when he synchronized for the first time with Aguilar or with Clay. Thanks to that Desmond showed some muscle development while he was reliving Connor's memories, there's some activity implied here.

      Having that in mind I ask myself... if the new modern-day protagonist will relive the memories of Bayek... how the f"%# could he/she control the goddamned bird!? For now there's no genetic memory from the bird, only Bayek's. The only way to do that could be as you say: Bayek's actions are controled by the M.D.Ch and not Senu's or telepathy (Senu's action are simulated by Animus parameters obtained by Bayek's memories) or something else.

      Ufff... Yeah, I take this game too seriously even for my taste. But I really like it *sad face*

      What I meant is that obviously while the Animus-user has to participate in the simulation to allow synchronization, (s)he can't actually control the ancestor to the extent that we as the player can control the ancestor. That is, we as the player can do things like run around crazy for 2 hours in the streets doing nothing if we want to. Do you think this means that the Animus-user can literally do that with the ancestor without desynchronizing? We can spend our time climbing buildings, then failing to climb buildings, then dropping for no reason, then running up a ledge we did not mean to, then trying to get back down from it, then getting up on that ledge again, then get back off and correctly climb what we wanted to do so. Do you think the Animus-user can actually do so many irrational movements without desynchronizing? We can run around the streets doing tasks for hours on end through many day-night cycles without taking the character "home" to sleep or use the bathroom or eat dinner, essentially fasting. Do you think the Animus-user can actually do that without desynchronizing? Avoiding sleep and food for hours on end would be a major deviation of what the ancestor did.

      We shouldn't see every way that we can control the character as what the Animus-user is able to control. The user controls the ancestor to some extent and has to become one with the ancestor's actions, but it's not going to have the freedom as we as the player do because we can do all sorts of irrational things we won't get desynchronized for for the purpose of gameplay. Sure, we get desynchronized for killing civilians or taking damage, but Ubisoft isn't going to make us desynchronize because we kept failing to climb a building correctly or kept jumping around like crazy or running around for days on end without returning to the hide-out when realistically these things would cause desynchronization for deviating from the ancestor's actions too much.

      We shouldn't see every last thing that we as the player experiences to be 100% what the Animus-user is experiencing even if Ubisoft tries to advertise that at some points. It's not like the maps we play in, which are scaled down to a fraction of their real size for the game, is the map the Animus-user is experiencing after all. That would make no sense.

      So as for Senu. We don't have to say that the Animus-user is controlling the eagle somehow. He or she is not. The Animus-user doesn't control everything we can control for gameplay reasons. He can control his ancestor to a certain extent, but the limitations before desynchronization are of course going to be much more severe. Remember Charlotte de la Cruz trying to have Thomas Stoddard rescue Bridget Bishop. She could barely control his movements and make him even try to save her. As a game, in Origins, we can control Bayek, and when he uses Eagle Vision, we can control Senu, but Bayek isn't actually controlling Senu, and what is only happening for the Animus-user, is that he is witnessing the memories of Bayek seeing through Senu's eyes.

      By the way, I actually did not quite understand everything about the response you wrote. xD

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    • THIS RESPONSE CONTAINS SPOILERS OF THE FOURTH COMIC OF AC: REFLECTIONS.

      What we were waiting for is here, more details of this new Eagle Vision: The comic shows what happened to Ratonhnhakë:tón after the events of the American Revolution in ACIII. He didn't die alone and his wife didn't abandon him. He had at least three children and one of these, his daughter, is the only one to have "the gift" (aka Eagle Vision). But one interesting thing is that she doesn't see a blue shimmer as her father: SHE LITERALLY CONNECTS TO A BIRD CLOSE TO HER TO SEE WHAT IT (the bird) SEES, just like Bayek does with Senu.

      This confirms some stuff discussed previously:

      1- It's not telepathy (not like Falcon and Redwing sadly :c). The user actually SEES what the bird does, but it's not sure if the user can control it.

      2- It's a precursor related ability.

      Now to you Pacificus, sorry for the delay XD

      Sol Pacificus wrote:
      What I meant is that obviously while the Animus-user has to participate in the simulation to allow synchronization, (s)he can't actually control the ancestor to the extent that we as the player can control the ancestor. That is, we as the player can do things like run around crazy for 2 hours in the streets doing nothing if we want to. Do you think this means that the Animus-user can literally do that with the ancestor without desynchronizing? We can spend our time climbing buildings, then failing to climb buildings, then dropping for no reason, then running up a ledge we did not mean to, then trying to get back down from it, then getting up on that ledge again, then get back off and correctly climb what we wanted to do so. Do you think the Animus-user can actually do so many irrational movements without desynchronizing? We can run around the streets doing tasks for hours on end through many day-night cycles without taking the character "home" to sleep or use the bathroom or eat dinner, essentially fasting. Do you think the Animus-user can actually do that without desynchronizing? Avoiding sleep and food for hours on end would be a major deviation of what the ancestor did.

      Actually, yeah, kinda XD... but I know what you wanna say: "Desmond didn't run like crazy for 17 hours while he was in a coma to save the whole world". Of course not, but the extent that the Animus-user has to control his ancestor's actions in the simulation is the same as the player's. This can be confirmed in the user manual of AC1, where Warren Vidic post some notes. Textually it says:

      In the controls section: "Vidic - When we switched the animus control scheme to use standard video-game controls I guessed that the subject's learning curve would improve but the increased acclimatization rate we are seeing with these slacker types is astounding" -This means that the Animus-user has controls of the ancestor's actions, of course not as completely as Daniel Cross when he revived the memories of Nicolai Orelov's son 24/7 (other example that confirms the control the animus-user has in the simulation), but some as: walking, running, climbing, jumping, hiding, fighting, etc. are made at conscience of the Animus-user.

      In the Awareness levels: "Vidic - Yes! And learn it well! He MUST keep his eye on the indicator. Every time he becomes exposed we lose time!" -This means that the Animus-user can be very indiscreet in the simulation, making guards to become hostile and starting an open conflict. Meaning that, once again, the animus-user's actions are the player's. That's why it called a simulation.

      If that's not enough proof, we have the puppet concept: The animus-user choose parts of his/her body to control those of his/her ancestor. This was represented by the controls of the joystick: Triangle/Y for the head, Circle/B for both arms, Square/X for the right hand and X/A for the legs.

      And final proof: The scene when Desmond syncs for the first time with Haytham (when Rebbeca tells him to complete an obstacle course) and when Callum syncs for the second time with Aguilar.

      Sol Pacificus wrote:
      We shouldn't see every way that we can control the character as what the Animus-user is able to control. The user controls the ancestor to some extent and has to become one with the ancestor's actions, but it's not going to have the freedom as we as the player do because we can do all sorts of irrational things we won't get desynchronized for for the purpose of gameplay. Sure, we get desynchronized for killing civilians or taking damage, but Ubisoft isn't going to make us desynchronize because we kept failing to climb a building correctly or kept jumping around like crazy or running around for days on end without returning to the hide-out when realistically these things would cause desynchronization for deviating from the ancestor's actions too much.

      We shouldn't see every last thing that we as the player experiences to be 100% what the Animus-user is experiencing even if Ubisoft tries to advertise that at some points. It's not like the maps we play in, which are scaled down to a fraction of their real size for the game, is the map the Animus-user is experiencing after all. That would make no sense.

      That's because of one thing: The simulation has something that it's explored in the games but not in the comics, novels, manga or the movie: Open-World. Every animus simulation has one, the difference is that it's the media that determines if this concept is worth viewing or not. Take for example the games: Open-World is the place where we (the player as the animus-user) can go in the simulation from point A to point B to start a memory or collect some stuff that can improve our sync. The only way to desync in the Open-World would be dying because of fall damage or combat. This doesn't happen in comics, novels, etc. because it'd be boring and it's not worth it. This books, pages and tales drive the readers RIGHT into the actions, right into the memories where constraints and limitations are more relevant than in Open-World. What we see in the comics, movie, manga and novels are the memories we do in the game.

      Other thing that it's important, it's the way the Animus simulates the situation. The machine takes the hard disk (containing all the ancestors dna samples in form of codes) and with the help of an algorithm, it sequences the data and built the world. This can be checked out in Heresy, where Simon Hathaway sync for the first time with his ancestor's memory.

      Sol Pacificus wrote:
      So as for Senu. We don't have to say that the Animus-user is controlling the eagle somehow. He or she is not. The Animus-user doesn't control everything we can control for gameplay reasons. He can control his ancestor to a certain extent, but the limitations before desynchronization are of course going to be much more severe. Remember Charlotte de la Cruz trying to have Thomas Stoddard rescue Bridget Bishop. She could barely control his movements and make him even try to save her. As a game, in Origins, we can control Bayek, and when he uses Eagle Vision, we can control Senu, but Bayek isn't actually controlling Senu, and what is only happening for the Animus-user, is that he is witnessing the memories of Bayek seeing through Senu's eyes.

      Indeed, the spoiler of AC:Reflection confirms this, but it doesn't say if the bird moves by itself or it's controled by the user.

      Sol Pacificus wrote:
      By the way, I actually did not quite understand everything about the response you wrote. xD

      Yeah, I was waiting that. Damn *sad face* Well, the only way I can explain this to you is by giving you the best example of this: When Desmond synced with Haytham in ACIII. That's all I can say *very sad face* TwT

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    • I'm actually still not convinced. The Assassin's Creed dialogue might be evidence, but I think it contradicts evidence from later material and shows that originally Ubisoft took the whole "Animus is exactly like a video game" too literally and extremely.

      I think you have it backwards when you argue that comics don't show the open-world aspect because authors want us to jump right into the action. Sure, that's an OOU-explanation, but IU, it makes more sense that a user of the Animus is severely limited in where he goes. If you use the "open-world" argument and say that users of the Animus have an open-world like players of the game, well you should know that in real-life, the open-world is limitless. It's not limited to one city, but the entire world. So logically, if the simulation is "open-world", the Animus-user would be able to explore the entire world even when the ancestor did not go there at the time. The reason why this is not logical is because this would diverge from the ancestor's path and cause desynchronization. The fact that Assassin's Creed: Trial by Fire expressly shows Charlotte de la Cruz's inability to even get Thomas Stoddard to save Bridget Bishop's life without desynchronizing is clear evidence of what limitations the Animus-user has. This example refutes the idea that a comic book doesn't show the "open-world" freedom just because it wants us to dive right into the action and what happened because otherwise we won't see Charlotte trying to save Bridget and failing but just not trying to save her at all. It's clearly shown she failed to control her ancestor into saving Bridget.

      You have to remember then that what the Animus-user is viewing and experiencing is still a memory record of the ancestor's experiences. If Arno on a certain date didn't visit the Pantheon but stayed at the Assassin headquarters, it doesn't make any sense that the Animus-user can proceed all the way to the Pantheon. There's no memory record of that. It'd be too divergent from the ancestor's path, who won't know what was going on around the Pantheon and what civilians were there at that exact time. If you argue it's "open world" and therefore the Animus-user is somehow not limited with the fact that the ancestor didn't travel to a location at least a mile away, then logically, the Animus-user is not limited by where the ancestor hasn't gone, which means that the Animus-user should be able to run all the way to China the whole time his ancestor is in France.

      It does not make any logical sense for the simulation to give that much freedom. If taking injury causes desynchronizing or even killing a guard when an ancestor didn't kill any in that mission costs some percentage of synchronization, well, objectively-speaking, running a mile away from the ancestor's path is more divergent from the ancestor's memory then staying in the same place he did and getting hurt a little, and that's what synchronization is: staying true to the ancestor's memory data.

      Ultimately, we shouldn't take gameplay mechanics too literally as 100% what the Animus-user is experiencing even if Ubisoft tried to force that premise too hard in the first game. It just doesn't make any logical sense. If desynchronization is deviation from an ancestor's actions and the memory data, why do we lose synchronization in free-roam only from taking damage and not other deviations? It's gameplay mechanics for the player's convenience. Of course, maybe it can be argued that only playing actual memories is playing what the Animus-user is experiencing, free-roam being just a gameplay mechanic for the player entirely, but then this just goes to show that again, not everything we play is what the Animus-user experiences. If taking damage causes loss of synchronization, why won't playing side-memories out of order, a greater deviation, cost synchronization? We shouldn't take gameplay mechanics to make a game fun and convenient for a player so literally.

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    • Sol Pacificus wrote:
      I'm actually still not convinced. The Assassin's Creed dialogue might be evidence, but I think it contradicts evidence from later material and shows that originally Ubisoft took the whole "Animus is exactly like a video game" too literally and extremely.

      I think you have it backwards when you argue that comics don't show the open-world aspect because authors want us to jump right into the action. Sure, that's an OOU-explanation, but IU, it makes more sense that a user of the Animus is severely limited in where he goes. If you use the "open-world" argument and say that users of the Animus have an open-world like players of the game, well you should know that in real-life, the open-world is limitless. It's not limited to one city, but the entire world. So logically, if the simulation is "open-world", the Animus-user would be able to explore the entire world even when the ancestor did not go there at the time. The reason why this is not logical is because this would diverge from the ancestor's path and cause desynchronization. The fact that Assassin's Creed: Trial by Fire expressly shows Charlotte de la Cruz's inability to even get Thomas Stoddard to save Bridget Bishop's life without desynchronizing is clear evidence of what limitations the Animus-user has. This example refutes the idea that a comic book doesn't show the "open-world" freedom just because it wants us to dive right into the action and what happened because otherwise we won't see Charlotte trying to save Bridget and failing but just not trying to save her at all. It's clearly shown she failed to control her ancestor into saving Bridget.

      You have to remember then that what the Animus-user is viewing and experiencing is still a memory record of the ancestor's experiences. If Arno on a certain date didn't visit the Pantheon but stayed at the Assassin headquarters, it doesn't make any sense that the Animus-user can proceed all the way to the Pantheon. There's no memory record of that. It'd be too divergent from the ancestor's path, who won't know what was going on around the Pantheon and what civilians were there at that exact time. If you argue it's "open world" and therefore the Animus-user is somehow not limited with the fact that the ancestor didn't travel to a location at least a mile away, then logically, the Animus-user is not limited by where the ancestor hasn't gone, which means that the Animus-user should be able to run all the way to China the whole time his ancestor is in France.

      It does not make any logical sense for the simulation to give that much freedom. If taking injury causes desynchronizing or even killing a guard when an ancestor didn't kill any in that mission costs some percentage of synchronization, well, objectively-speaking, running a mile away from the ancestor's path is more divergent from the ancestor's memory then staying in the same place he did and getting hurt a little, and that's what synchronization is: staying true to the ancestor's memory data.

      Ultimately, we shouldn't take gameplay mechanics too literally as 100% what the Animus-user is experiencing even if Ubisoft tried to force that premise too hard in the first game. It just doesn't make any logical sense. If desynchronization is deviation from an ancestor's actions and the memory data, why do we lose synchronization in free-roam only from taking damage and not other deviations? It's gameplay mechanics for the player's convenience. Of course, maybe it can be argued that only playing actual memories is playing what the Animus-user is experiencing, free-roam being just a gameplay mechanic for the player entirely, but then this just goes to show that again, not everything we play is what the Animus-user experiences. If taking damage causes loss of synchronization, why won't playing side-memories out of order, a greater deviation, cost synchronization? We shouldn't take gameplay mechanics to make a game fun and convenient for a player so literally.

      The way I see the Animus working is that it decodes and presents a visual representation of the way that particular ancestor perceived those memories. That's why you can't visit China when your ancestor never went there because the Animus can't render a simulation of China because, as far as the Animus is considered, there is no China. France would be the entire world if your ancestor only ever experienced France and never set foot outside that location.

      Also, another thing to consider is that the memories that you experience are not actual 100% accurate representation of how those events occurred, but in fact a representation of how that ancestor perceived those events which adds in the biasedness of the stories that we get to experience in the games according to the way the ancestor felt then.

      I also think that the Animus just works to maintain the consistency of the more crucial and ingrained memories. That's why you have to perform the main memories in order. The side missions are minor memories which didn't have as much of an impact on the ancestor as the main memories, that's why they usually don't involve synchronization constraints and can be carried out in any way as long as you complete the required object which matters.

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    • Cristophorus35 wrote:
      In conclussion (for those who dislike to read a lot, not me of course):

      1- Eagle Vision is definitely a Precursor related ability and not a way of representing an Assassin's observational skills.

      2- There are many types of Eagle Vision: Altair's (Default), Ezio's (available while running), Ezio's (mastered version also called Eagle Sense. It allows to "see" through time, watch past and future events". Also identifies the true nature of a person [Normal Eagle Vision cannot do this]), Connor's and Aveline's (identifies clues fast), Edward's (tag enemies), Shay's (tag hidden enemies and locates them), Arno's (short duration [who thought this was a good idea?]), and Frye Twin's (It evolves with practice).

      3- It's not confirmed if Bayek possesses Eagle Vision.

      The way eagle vision or the sixth sense is explained through the lore is that everyone has the tendency to unlock it but those with a higher concentration of First Civ DNA are able to use it without much practice. So, according to this Arno is said to have had a very low concentration of First Civ DNA compared to other protagonists in the series. This meant that he didn't have much control over it that's why he could only experience it in bursts and wasn't able to fully control it. About the assassination dialogues, Arno's low First Civ DNA concentration meant that he couldn't carry out full conversations with his victims but was only able to experience flashes of their lives. This, however, is not the case during Germain's assassination where Arno is able to carry out full-fledged conversations with Germain because of Germain's high First Civ DNA concentration.

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    • Xangr8 wrote: Also, another thing to consider is that the memories that you experience are not actual 100% accurate representation of how those events occurred, but in fact a representation of how that ancestor perceived those events which adds in the biasedness of the stories that we get to experience in the games according to the way the ancestor felt then.

      While I had always considered this were a possibility, I've always been pretty certain this is a particular interpretation that hasn't been confirmed, and I actually doubt that this is how it is canonically. It's one fan interpretation that looms about due to fans feeling the need to explain every gameplay mechanic, but the sources never say that the memories synthesized are more about perception than what they were in reality. In fact, I think it's pretty clear from recent releases it is about actual memories not just the perception of them, and especially that there isn't a "biasedness" factor to it because if that were present that would skew the accuracy of memories immensely so that nothing synthesized were ever reliable anyways. It doesn't make much sense anyways since although in reality, our bias may influence how we remember certain things or interpret our memories, the Animus is meant to function not just based on what we consciously remember, but what our DNA has recorded even if it's something we don't remember 100%. Otherwise, I don't think it would be possible to create a virtual simulation of the entire world the ancestor lived in that is functioning and relatively accurate.

      I would say the same about the rest. They are valid interpretations on how the Animus works, but we should be mindful that it's all speculation at best.

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    • Sol Pacificus wrote:

      Xangr8 wrote: Also, another thing to consider is that the memories that you experience are not actual 100% accurate representation of how those events occurred, but in fact a representation of how that ancestor perceived those events which adds in the biasedness of the stories that we get to experience in the games according to the way the ancestor felt then.

      While I had always considered this were a possibility, I've always been pretty certain this is a particular interpretation that hasn't been confirmed, and I actually doubt that this is how it is canonically. It's one fan interpretation that looms about due to fans feeling the need to explain every gameplay mechanic, but the sources never say that the memories synthesized are more about perception than what they were in reality. In fact, I think it's pretty clear from recent releases it is about actual memories not just the perception of them, and especially that there isn't a "biasedness" factor to it because if that were present that would skew the accuracy of memories immensely so that nothing synthesized were ever reliable anyways. It doesn't make much sense anyways since although in reality, our bias may influence how we remember certain things or interpret our memories, the Animus is meant to function not just based on what we consciously remember, but what our DNA has recorded even if it's something we don't remember 100%. Otherwise, I don't think it would be possible to create a virtual simulation of the entire world the ancestor lived in that is functioning and relatively accurate.

      I would say the same about the rest. They are valid interpretations on how the Animus works, but we should be mindful that it's all speculation at best.

      Anouk Bachman, the Brand Manager of Publishing, did talk about it during the ATA interview and also discussed the possibility of further exploring this aspect.

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