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The Sickness was a virtual representation of one of Bayek's genetic memories, relived by Layla Hassan through the Portable Animus HR-8.

Description

People are dying from a mysterious sickness in the Euhemeria slums. Locals have started burning the dead, cursing them for eternity.

Dialogue

While in the Euhemeria slums, Bayek came upon the site of burning corpses.

  • Bayek: Burning corpses! This is blasphemy! Who did this?

Bayek addressed a young healer at the edge of the pit.

  • Bayek: Hey, why are you burning the dead? Don't you fear the gods? Their souls will be forever cursed.
  • Woman: I'm sorry to do it, but I have no choice in this. The gods themselves have afflicted us with a pestilence. The dead must be burned to save the living.
  • Bayek: What pestilence? Is there a plague?
  • Woman: Truly, I don't know. Elders have begun falling sick. Children have died clutching their bellies in agony as their parents watch on, lifeless in their beds.
  • Bayek: This would be cruel even for the angriest of gods.
  • Woman: No one cares about us. Any help would be appreciated... in the Faiyum, the poor aren't worth spit.

Bayek and the healer headed to the Euhemeria harbor.

  • Slums Sobek Priest: My children, your hunger is known. Turn to Sobek for your nourishment. Sobek has provided a way. Though the food is humble, it gives life. Eat with thanksgiving, and trust in he who is Pointed of Teeth. The Lord of Waters may take our souls, but we will all rejoice in the Field of Reeds! The Splashing One, who came from the Great Goddess! He who made the herbage green. Lord of the Nile! Dua Sobek!

They arrived at the harbor. The healer checked on one of the dead lying on the ground.

  • Woman: Another dead farmer whose family will now lose their land. They used to eat at the alms kitchen in the market. But soldiers began harassing them. Greek merchants said they were bad for business.

Bayek investigated the corpse.

  • Bayek: There are no signs of a plague on the body.

Bayek investigated a number of bowls laying on hay nearby.

  • Bayek: These bowls are filthy. What have the villagers been eating? They must have the food stored somewhere. I should have a look around.

Bayek visited the storehouse and investigated the urns.

  • Bayek: These urns contain strong seasonings.

Bayek investigated the jars of food.

  • Bayek: This food is rancid. It smells like shit. It's completely unfit for eating.
    This gruel is not fit for rats, let along people. The strong spices are not for taste, they are disguising the rot. I need to talk with whoever made it.

Bayek spoke to the healer.

  • Bayek: Tell me about the food you eat. Where does it come from?
  • Woman: A merchant makes it for the poor here. It's not much, but at least it's something. We're thankful. You're welcome to try some.
  • Bayek: By the gods no. I do not know how you stomach it. I need to talk to the merchant. Where can I find him?
  • Woman: His house is to the south of the town market. I can take you.
  • Bayek: Let's visit this merchant of yours. I will follow you.
  • Woman: May Sobek reward you for helping.

Bayek followed the healer to the merchant's residence.

  • Bayek: I have passed many prosperous farms. People here seem to be doing well. Why are there so many poor?
  • Woman: Ah yes. Those are Greek farms. The Greeks pay lower taxes, so they prosper. Meanwhile, the Egyptian farmers are slowly forced from their lands.
  • Bayek: What happens to the land when the farmers leave?
  • Woman: Once the owners die, by law the land is freed. If it's good land, the Greeks take it. If not, the desert takes it. Either way, Egyptians are left to starve. Many end up in the slums.

Bayek and the healer arrived at the merchant's residence.

  • Woman: This is the home of the merchant who provides the food.
  • Bayek: Even the cats here look better fed than the poor.

They entered the courtyard.

  • Woman: The owner is obviously of substance. Not all Egyptians seem to be equal.
  • Bayek: Some are just more equal than others.

They entered the kitchen at the back, horrified at what they discovered.

  • Woman: This is awful!
  • Bayek: No wonder people are falling sick!
  • Woman: Who would do this?
  • Bayek: It is time we met this poisonous merchant.
  • Woman: Give him a taste of his own cooking.

The merchant entered the kitchen with two guards.

  • Man: How may I help you? This is my home. Are you lost?
  • Bayek: You can explain to me why you have been poisoning the poor. My guess is so you can take their land. It is easy if they are dead.
  • Man: You're referring to the trouble in the slums? Whatever you've heard, I assure you, you misunderstand. I do what I can to help.
  • Bayek: I have seen your kitchen, merchant. I know what you are doing. And I will see that you are brought to justice.
  • Man: Oh... I see. Well that changes things. Now you're trespassing. And I have the right to protect myself. Men!

The guards and the merchant attacked Bayek.

  • Man: If you were reasonable, I wouldn't have to do this!
    We could have worked this out!

Bayek killed one of the guards. The merchant fled the place.

  • Man: I'm not dying over this! Hold him off!

Bayek killed the other guard and pursued the merchant.

  • Man: Where are my men?
    They were just filthy beggars!
    Why do you care so much about them? No-one will miss them!
    We can talk about this! I'm wealthy! I can pay you!

Bayek killed the merchant.

  • Bayek: This merchant of death was murdering the poor for their land. His love of money was the real sickness. Faiyum won't miss him. The dead can rest. There will be no more burning.

Outcome

Bayek discovered the source that was causing the deaths of villagers in the Euhemeria slums and eliminated the operation.

Trivia

  • Bayek's statement that "some are just more equal than others," in response to the apparent inequality in Euhemeria, may be a reference to Animal Farm, an allegorical novella by George Orwell.

References

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