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"Ah, but hasn't Egypt been invaded before? The Persians, the Nubians, the Greeks. And yet, it is our country that changes people. Our people endure. We will change the Romans just as we changed Alexander. It is up to us to see that Egypt always retains that power."
―Nitokris to Bayek and Aya, 70 BCE.[src]

Nitokris's tomb

Nitokris was the God's Wife of Amun in Karnak who lived during the 1st century BCE. She was the mother of Isidora, who assumed her position after her death at the hands of tomb robbers.

Biography

During the 1st century BCE, Nitokris served as the latest God's Wife of Amun in the temple of Karnak in Thebes. In 70 BCE, Nitokris met a 15-year-old Bayek and Aya, the former being the son of the Medjay Sabu. Bayek and Aya had came to Thebes in search of Sabu and hoped Nitokris may have had information about the Medjay's whereabouts. Instead, Nitokris directed them to the location of a Nubian tribe including Bayek's friend Kensa in the city, suggesting that she may have the information they seek. After Bayek's subsequent meeting with Kensa, he returned to Nitokris at the temple, having fully realized the importance of the Medjay role he was training to inherit.[1]

Later in her reign, tombs in the surrounding region became frequently desecrated by tomb robbers and robbed of its riches. Determined to end the desecration, Nitokris sought to conduct an ancient Ma'at ritual to deter the tomb robbers, visiting the Necropolis of the Nobles in the Theban Necropolis for more information.[2] However, her attempt was discovered by a group of tomb robbers, who had her murdered.[3]

Legacy

After her death, Nitokris was buried in the very same tomb.[4] The Apple of Eden under her care was also passed down to Isidora, who went on to pursue vengeance against the tomb robbers by unleashing a "curse" onto the city.[2]

Merti, one of the tomb robbers indirectly involved in her death, often made visits to her crypt and gave offerings to make amends.[4]

Appearances

References

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