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Was about to agree as speculative as that is, but then I remember that Al Mualim's methods was specifically for his agents to perform shocking, high-profile, awe-inspiring assassinations in broad daylight in front of crowds so as to send a message of fear even if such approaches were near suicidal. This is explained by Pierre Bellec and is also the case with the real-life Assassins historically.
 
Was about to agree as speculative as that is, but then I remember that Al Mualim's methods was specifically for his agents to perform shocking, high-profile, awe-inspiring assassinations in broad daylight in front of crowds so as to send a message of fear even if such approaches were near suicidal. This is explained by Pierre Bellec and is also the case with the real-life Assassins historically.
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We see Altaïr demonstrate this in one of the AC trailers.

Latest revision as of 20:29, July 14, 2017

ACsenior wrote: Or it could be as simple as that Al Mualim enforced the idea of being a blade in the crowd rather than what the Assassins become since AC2. Air assassinations and other means of sticking to the shadows don't enforce being as and unseen among the people. As there would be no need for acrobatics except for during the escape after the assassination that was performed while being a blade in the crowd.

Was about to agree as speculative as that is, but then I remember that Al Mualim's methods was specifically for his agents to perform shocking, high-profile, awe-inspiring assassinations in broad daylight in front of crowds so as to send a message of fear even if such approaches were near suicidal. This is explained by Pierre Bellec and is also the case with the real-life Assassins historically.

We see Altaïr demonstrate this in one of the AC trailers.

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